Archive for the 'General' Category

Quick Facebook Non-Public Profile Setting

Sunday, January 4th, 2015

If you’re a Facebook user, at some point, you’ll want to evaluate how public your individual Facebook profile is. There are three types of settings you can choose - Public (default), Hide Your Profile From Search Engines and Hide Certain Parts of Your Public Profile*.

Here’s the official Facebook instructions to hide your profile from search engines: What should I do if I don’t want search engines to link to my profile?

And this is how your profile will appear if you’ve chosen NO (Hide Your Profile From Search Engines).

No Public Facebook Profile

*These section settings are configurable by editing individual sections of your Facebook profile.

iOS7 Mail Question

Thursday, July 31st, 2014

AnonymZ, I guess

Tuesday, July 22nd, 2014

A new-to-me anonymizing referrer appeared in the referrer logs today, AnonymZ.Com.

From the Web site:

To make a long story short: is a free and easy way to block the referrer when a visitor clicks a link on your homepage. It works with every browser as you do only have to add a in front of every outgoing http:// link. Use it as you want.


A note, this service does *not* block your IP Address, cookies or other information that may be logged when you visit a Web site, it only blocks the referrer of the site you may have clicked a link.

Kobo Touch eReader User Agent

Thursday, September 6th, 2012

Long time reader Harald shared his new Kobo Touch eReader with cleverhack.

Interestingly enough, the browser shows as Safari 1.3 in logs, which is an absurdly old Safari version.

User Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Linux; U; Android 2.0; en-us;) AppleWebKit/533.1 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/4.0 Mobile Safari/533.1 (Kobo Touch)

Nook User Agent

Saturday, August 25th, 2012

I had no idea you could browse the Web on a Nook.

User Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Linux; U; Android 2.2.1; en-us; NOOK BNRV200 Build/ERD79 1.4.3) Apple WebKit/533.1 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/4.0 Mobile Safari/533.1

Here’s an IP address you don’t see that often

Tuesday, May 24th, 2011

in your Web site logs…an IP address from the range of 2.102.206.* Wow.

That’s an IP4 address starting with a 2. As someone fascinated with the history of the Internet, I find this pretty cool.

It’s a RIPE address (European) and assigned to the UK.

Don’t like Shyftr? Block the IP.

Saturday, April 12th, 2008

This past weekend there’s been a conversation about Shyftr a new RSS service that allows people to read and comment on full text stories on the Shyftr site, rather making the reader click through to the originating blog to comment. The thought is that folks who care about pageviews for advertising will lose out in such a scenario.

So, in the spirit of helping the wider, feathers in a ruffle, blogging community out, I’ve pasted the Shyftr RSS bot info below. The good news is that you can block the Shyftr IP address from accessing your blog (if you already have that capability through your blog hosting solution, etc.). As of present, the IP address is

Unlike other annoying bots, I would not block the user agent in your .htaccess file as the RSS bot software the Shyftr folks are using is the generic MagpieRSS toolset, which is used by other RSS services. Hopefully, the people at Shyftr will rename the user agent to something more uniquely identifiable in the future so you can block via .htaccess.

(Note: Blocking a future unique Shyftr user agent via robots.txt probably won’t work as the crawler would need to fetch the robots.txt file first before fetching your feed and I didn’t see that behavior tonight.)

Http Code: 200 Date: Apr 12 19:48:28 Http Version: HTTP/1.0 Size in Bytes: 6244
Referer: -
Agent: MagpieRSS/0.72 (+
Http Code: 200 Date: Apr 12 19:48:28 Http Version: HTTP/1.0 Size in Bytes: 1406
Referer: -
Agent: -

Brute force SEO: NY Times using keyword tagging in the page title tag

Sunday, January 6th, 2008

Building upon a discussion elsewhere on the Web, here’s some brute force SEO for you.

Apparently, the NY Times is inserting tagging in the page META title tag, in the instances where it seems that article headlines lack sufficient keywords. Normally, the Times just carries the article’s headline into the page META title tag.

For example, in the article headlined The Falling-Down Professions, the page title tag reads as “Economic Conditions-Economic trends-legal profession-lawyers-prestige-doctors - New York Times”.

You see, the page title tag is important for SEO as Google in particular lends much weight to the text contained within the title tag.

All in all, the NY Times approach is definitely an interesting methodology for organizations deploying content management systems and who wish to build traffic from search engines.

YouTube spamming

Saturday, December 8th, 2007

I was browsing YouTube tonight for that baby got back wedding dance video, which is actually quite hilarious if you haven’t seen it yet.

Anyway, there I was searching (view search results) and as you can see, that same video was posted multiple times by multiple people. Honestly, I can’t tell who was the original poster.

But I guess my question is why did people repost the video? My best guess is that people are reposting videos so they can get views especially for the About This Video text box and populate their channel subscription numbers. Are there any other reasons I’m missing?

LargeSmall non-existent

Sunday, November 25th, 2007

Looking through my log files, I find a crawler from a company that doesn’t yet quite exist on the Web, the user agent sans descriptive URL looked sorta spammy, so I had to Google them.

Not much on the homepage but a three columned div layout with a Web 2.0 green background, a commented out section in the source code about who is investing in them, and this hyperbole filled description….

“…an exciting new disruptive media and content publishing technology with many interesting applications.”

If anyone can parse that quote (into meaningful dollars), please let me know. All I know is that they are sending a crawler out to fetch feeds, how they are going to parlay that into content, I’m not sure.

Http Code: 200 Date: Nov 25 13:42:48 Http Version: HTTP/1.1 Size in Bytes: 21847
Referer: -
Agent: LargeSmall Crawler

Yahoo deliverability - this time it’s personal

Sunday, October 28th, 2007

I’ve written about Yahoo deliverability earlier, but now it’s personal.

The mailserver I use is being deferred via a 421 code by Yahoo, and judging by the fact I’m on shared hosting and the mailserver IP has been spotted on some minor blocklists, I’ve got a virtual neighbor with a problem.


In this case, Yahoo is definitely not deferring my mail because of content (I’ve tested this) but they’re taking action because of the originating IP address.

iPhone wifi madness

Monday, July 30th, 2007

Well, not madness, but something definitely weird.

I was wondering if anyone has seen any iPhones getting onto networks they should not be on. I am aware of a situation where an iPhone jumped on a wifi network with WEP and MAC Address filtering enabled.

The thing is, the iPhone only had the WEP key, but the iPhone MAC address hadn’t been authorized and iPhone still was granted an IP address via DHCP.

When I tried my iPhone on the network with the WEP key and but no MAC address authorization, I could not get on.

Another wrinkle is that the successful iPhone had been synched to a Mac laptop that was previously allowed on that network. Could that be it?