Archive for the 'Web Marketing' Category

Tweets can influence SERPs

Saturday, February 6th, 2016

Posted below are two screenshots for the first page SERP for Joy Larkin. (Heh, see what I did there?). First screenshot is when I haven’t tweeted in a while and the second screenshot is approximately 48 hours later after some tweet activity. My Twitter account does have my name on it.

You can see that time and number of tweets do influence position on the search engine results page.

Before.
SERP before tweeting

And after.
SERP after tweeting

Quick Twitter SEO Observation

Wednesday, February 3rd, 2016

Here’s a quick Twitter SEO observation. For the longest time, I had my about.me profile URL in my Twitter bio. It was ok (the analytics for the free version are less than optimal), so I decided to see if switching up the URL would improve SEO for Joy Larkin, as there are a few women named Joy Larkin on the Web, and of course, I wanted to rank first.

Last week, I added my LinkedIn URL to my Twitter profile. After a few days, my LinkedIn profile ranked first.

Joy Larkin SEO

Being ever curious, tonight I added my cleverhack about page to my Twitter bio. Now I’ll watch to see if that gets ranked first for my name.

Can Web Analytics Track Company Web Site Visits?

Thursday, January 7th, 2016

Services like Hubspot, Leadlander and even the Google Analytics network domain function reverse lookup the WHOIS information for the visitor’s IP address to sometimes find the company domain of the visitor.

In some cases, the visitor’s organization may be acting as their own Internet Service Provider, and that information is reflected in the WHOIS lookup of the IP address. At other times, the organization may use a third party ISP like Comcast Business, and Comcast Business provides the organization’s name on the WHOIS record.

(Remember: you can always perform a manual whois lookup from an online tool like network-tools.com or via the command line.)

However, in my 20+ years of experience on the Internet, IP WHOIS lookup for an originating organization is maybe 70% accurate if you are very lucky. As of right now, there is no convention compelling ISPs to publish customer information - business or individual - on IP WHOIS records. Back in the day, Pacific Bell used to provide the customer name on the WHOIS for static IPs, but then there were privacy concerns for the customer.

In addition, I’ve heard of some marketing automation tools being able to identify a current visitor from an organization if a previous visitor with that same IP address (or IP address block) had given information to someone else using the marketing automation tool. You should consult your software provider on if/how they implement this “secondary lookup” method.

Post inspired by this Quora thread.

2016 Easy SEO: Update Your Web Site Copyright Date

Wednesday, December 30th, 2015

Here’s a quick and easy SEO trick for you.

We all know that Google indexes freshly updated content on your Web site. Since it’s the New Year, take a moment and check if your Web site copyright notices are updated. Not only do you get that piece of mind from an updated copyright date, but you’ve just updated each page of your Web site since each page should have the footer.

For those of you using PHP, here’s the code to insert into your footer, if it isn’t already there.

© Copyright < ?php echo date("Y") ?>

Easy, huh? (Yes, I have blogged this SEO tip before.)

HubSpot Webcrawler

Monday, November 23rd, 2015

Apparently, SMB Internet Marketing services firm HubSpot has a webcrawler. This bot hit cleverhack over the weekend, crawling multiple pages of the site from 6 different IP addresses within the 54.174.#.# IP block (HubSpot AWS-HUBSPOT (NET-54-174-56-0-1) 54.174.56.0 - 54.174.59.255), which is HubSpot using Amazon Web Services.

HubSpot Webcrawler

Google PageSpeed Insights

Sunday, August 30th, 2015

As we all — or at least SEOs and Web Developers — know by now, Google uses site speed as a factor in their ranking algorithm because in theory, a faster loading site is more useful.

This is a user agent for Google PageSpeed Insights (at least Google announces the intention in the description). Also, of note, this instance of the crawler was not part of a manual request but instead part of a quasi-regular crawl.

Host: 66.249.93.214
/
Http Code: 200 Date: Aug 30 09:47:41
Http Version: HTTP/1.1
Size in Bytes: 14300
Referer: -
Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux x86_64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko; Google Page Speed Insights) Chrome/27.0.1453 Safari/537.36

Time goes by

Monday, August 24th, 2015

Upon the news that Rutgers University is spending millions on cyber security.

I’ll just sit here on my (virtual) rocking chair and muse about the fact that about 20 years ago, abuse of the the Unix ‘wall’ command caused minor havoc on eden.rutgers.edu, especially during heavy use in the evening.

And yes, the ability to use ‘wall’ was quickly removed by the admins.

Carry on.

Spoofed Googlebot User Agent

Monday, September 19th, 2011

Well, this visitor caught my eye earlier as the originating IP address is from the technology company Oracle but with a Googlebot user agent. Another clue that this is a spoofed user agent is that they came in off of a Google Search Engine referrer, as Googlebot doesn’t usually do that. Also, their browser had requested images off of my server (as browsers usually do) and Googlebot usually does not.

Why would someone spoof Googlebot? Aside from the amusing (and covert) aspects, some Web sites may serve different content to Googlebot — for example, cloaking or doorway pages which are a big Google Webmaster no no (i.e. a Flash or Video based Web site serving text for indexing or a specifically optimized entry page).

Host: 137.254.4.8

/2010/12/19/droid-user-agent/

Http Code: 200 Date: Sep 19 07:58:51 Http Version: HTTP/1.1 Size in Bytes: 10962

Referer: http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&source=hp&q=droid+user+agent&oq=droid+user+

Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (compatible; Googlebot/2.1; +http://www.google.com/bot.html)

Easy SEO: Update your copyright notice

Saturday, January 1st, 2011

Here’s a quick and easy SEO trick for you.

We all know that Google indexes freshly updated content on your Web site. Since it’s the New Year, take a moment and check if your Web site copyright notices are updated. Not only do you get that piece of mind from an updated copyright notice, but you’ve just updated each page of your Web site since each page should have the footer.

For those of you using PHP, here’s the code to insert into your footer, if it isn’t already there.

&copy; Copyright < ?php echo date("Y") ?>

Easy, huh?

Hey, thanks for the identity theft, Verizon Wireless

Monday, September 21st, 2009

So, today, I get this email from Verizon Wireless about their privacy policies for their wireless customers. At first I thought the email was spam because I have not been a Verizon Wireless customer for OVER 2 years.

I imagine my shock when I see my old Vermont cell phone number on the email. A phone number I have not had for over 5 years.

The email has a different account number and a different name than mine. It looks like the job of a really bad email append. I hope. I checked the headers of the email, and it was sent from an internet marketing organization called Moxie Interactive, which looks legit.

From: verizonwireless@email.vzwshop.com
Subject: Important Privacy Notice
Date: September 21, 2009 11:26:59 AM EDT
To: [myemailaddress]@cleverhack.com
Reply-To: replyto@email.vzwshop.com

To ensure our emails reach your inbox, please add verizonwireless@email.vzwshop.com to your address book.
Having trouble viewing this email? View online. En Español.

Phones & Accessories Plans Features & Downloads Messaging Support My Verizon

Re: Account Number ending XXXX
Dear JXXX VXXXXXXX:

At Verizon Wireless, we value you as a customer, and we know how important privacy is to you.
As a company, we have a long-standing policy of guarding personal customer information.
This notice contains information about Customer Proprietary Network Information (CPNI).
Verizon Wireless needs your permission to share your CPNI within the Verizon family of companies,
which includes our affiliates, agents and parent companies (including Vodafone), as well as
their subsidiaries. This information allows us to better serve you by identifying, offering and
providing the most appropriate communications products and services to fit your needs. You have
the right to request that we not share such information, so please read this notice carefully.
Regardless of your decision, your CPNI will never be shared by Verizon Wireless with any unrelated
third parties.

As your wireless provider, Verizon Wireless may have certain information about you that is made
available to us solely by virtue of our relationship with you, such as details regarding the
telecommunications services you purchase, as well as the type, destination, technical configuration,
location and amount of use of such services. This information and the related billing details are known
as CPNI. The protection of your CPNI is important to us, and we acknowledge that you have a right,
and we have a duty under federal and state law, to protect the confidentiality of this information.
You have a right to request that your CPNI remain private, and may do so by clicking the Do Not Share
My CPNI button below. Unless you notify us within 45 days of receiving this notice that you do not want
your CPNI shared, we will assume that you give us the right to share your CPNI with the authorized companies described above.
Please be advised if you allow your CPNI to be shared, your consent will remain valid until we receive your notice withdrawing it, or for two years, whichever comes first. You may withdraw your consent at any time through My Verizon.
If you would like more information on CPNI and selecting Do Not Share, please review the
frequently asked questions.

Sincerely,
Verizon Wireless

CPNI will not be shared within unrelated third parties. You may advise us not to share your CPNI by clicking the Do Not Share My CPNI button within this email, or you can sign into your My Verizon account and register for Do Not Share from the “profiles” page.
Selecting not to share your CPNI will not affect the status of the services you currently have with us. In addition, we can disclose your CPNI to comply with any laws, court order or subpoena, or to provide services to you pursuant to your Customer Agreement.
© 2009 Verizon Wireless.

Verizon Wireless | One Verizon Way | Mail Code: 180WVB | Basking Ridge, NJ 07920
This email was sent to [myemailaddress]@cleverhack.com and associated with you Verizon Wireless mobile number
802249XXXX. We respect your privacy. Please review our privacy policy for more information
about click activity with Verizon Wireless and links included in this email.

You may easily adjust your subscription preferences from your profile information.

Brute force SEO: NY Times using keyword tagging in the page title tag

Sunday, January 6th, 2008

Building upon a discussion elsewhere on the Web, here’s some brute force SEO for you.

Apparently, the NY Times is inserting tagging in the page META title tag, in the instances where it seems that article headlines lack sufficient keywords. Normally, the Times just carries the article’s headline into the page META title tag.

For example, in the article headlined The Falling-Down Professions, the page title tag reads as “Economic Conditions-Economic trends-legal profession-lawyers-prestige-doctors - New York Times”.

You see, the page title tag is important for SEO as Google in particular lends much weight to the text contained within the title tag.

All in all, the NY Times approach is definitely an interesting methodology for organizations deploying content management systems and who wish to build traffic from search engines.

topix.net redirect to .com?

Wednesday, March 14th, 2007

There was this article in [usually a subscription] yesterday’s Wall Street Journal about, basically, how a large number of companies have lost traffic because of either a change on their Web site or a change in the search engine agorithim, basically, just about everyone has a story about losing traffic.

Two thoughts I had about the article…

1)Did the Wall Street Journal really need to write an article about how what Topix.net really needs is a redirect to topix.com? Honestly, I don’t understand why it’s such a shocking revelation that changing something on a Web site might cause it to change in search engine results pages. Plus, the change that Topix.net needs to do, while a change, is probably the least impactful since if the use a 301, they should be good to go.

Although their CEO is openly doubtful of that claim since he is fearing the move of over 100K urls in the SERPS.

2)If I was someone from Yahoo or MSN yesterday, I would have lost my breakfast. The article in the Journal only talked about Google and pointed out that a number of sites get about 80% of their search engine traffic from Google.